From the category archives:

Resources

Gaming the Classroom

by Dr Davis on August 30, 2015

Gamification: Engaging Students With Narrative begins:

When looking at how engaged students are in playing games, it makes sense to capture some of the ideas that game designers use to engage the player. This idea of applying gaming mechanics to non-game situations is known as gamification.

What defines a game is having a goal or objective. However almost all games also have some sort of theme or story.

Interesting. Relates to book read three years ago and book on game design read two years ago.

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Rhetoric

by Dr Davis on August 28, 2015

Undergrad syllabus on Classical Rhetoric and Modern Political Discourse from MIT Open Courseware

undergraduate course in Rhetoric of Science from MIT Open Courseware

A Geographical History of Online Rhetoric and Composition Journals, from Kairos

Comp-Rhet resources on the Web from UMass

Semiotics for Beginners by Daniel Chandler

The rhetorical forest at BYU

Digital Rhetoric Collaborative blog

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Medieval Misconceptions

by Dr Davis on February 26, 2015

io9 has 10 Worst Misconceptions about Medieval Life You’d Get from Fantasy Books

What were inns?
“Once your neighbor opened up a fresh batch of ale, you might go to their house, pay a few pennies, and sit and drink with your fellow villagers.”

Equality in the Middle Ages?

In England, a widow could take up the trade of her dead husband — and Mortimer specifically cites tailor, armorer, and merchant as trades open to widows. Some female merchants were actually quite successful, managing international trading ventures with impressive capital.

Women engaged in criminal activity as well, including banditry. Many criminal gangs in Medieval England consisted of families, including wives with their husbands and sisters with their brothers.

Go on and read more. You know you want to.

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41 Must Read Books on Story, Play, and Design

by Dr Davis on January 9, 2015

from Culture Hacker

I was particularly interested in this because of Daniel Pink’s “Conceptual Age” idea, as posted here on TCE.

These sound very interesting:
Little Bets: How Breakthrough Ideas Emerge from Small Discoveries – Peter Sims

A Creator’s Guide to Transmedia Storytelling: How to Captivate and Engage Audiences Across Multiple Platforms – Andrea Phillips

Wonderbook: The Illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction – Jeff VanderMeer

Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction – Nathan Shedroff

Tinkertoys: A Handbook of Creative-Thinking Techniques – Michael Michalko

The only book I have read on the list is Jesse Schell’s, but I have listened to Jane McGonigal’s TED Talk.

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HOF: Excused Absences

by Dr Davis on December 29, 2014

Students who miss class because of the Rapture are, besides being forgiven, excused. Those left behind should consider this class an integral component of the Tribulation.

from walker_percy

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HOF: End of the Semester Blues

by Dr Davis on December 29, 2014

‘Tis the last week of the semester,
And my students gave to me:
Twelve whiny emails
Eleven dying grandmas
Ten family funerals
Nine nonsensical excuses
Eight exam schedule conflicts
Seven broken printers (slash flashdrives slash cars slash front doors . . . don’t ask about that last one)
Six missing papers
Five technological snafus (buh duh buh buh)
Four didn’t know due dates
Three incomplete requests
Two I can’t be failings
And one “can I present after finals, instead?”

from proftowanda

Note: This did not happen to me, but I can totally see this…

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CHE Fora HOF Reading

by Dr Davis on December 13, 2014

computer and glasses closerThe Chronicle of Higher Education fora Hall of Fame has given me some interesting post-final-grading entertainment and ideas. As I read, I will continue to post these.

Note: I am reading backwards through the HOF because… because I am reading backwards.

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Plagiarism sources

by Dr Davis on December 11, 2014

The first one I found referenced on the CHE fora is a flowchart of levels of plagiarism–though not all the academics agree it is accurate. I linked it because it is a place to start talking.

The second one is an online test for recognizing plagiarism from Indiana U.

Another plagiarism source–which I cannot watch because my flash is out of date–was recommended to me. It is at Northern Arizona U.

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Fiction Readers Make Better Lovers

by Dr Davis on November 30, 2014

mic dot com people read fictionThe article on Mic.com doesn’t actually say that.

It does, however, say that “Fiction readers make great friends as they tend to be more aware of others’ emotions.”

Brains are changed when people read!

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Writing for Journal Publication

by Dr Davis on November 20, 2014

One of my colleagues has requested that several of us come to a graduate class and talk about our experiences with getting published in journals.

To prepare for that, I went back through this blog to look for relevant posts. This post contains some distilled information, some links, and some ruminations based on the discussion in the class.

In November 2009, about a year after I started trying to get published, I wrote a post on my publication/rejection record for my most recent work.
5 papers submitted, 2 accepted, 2 rejected, 1 pending
I try to be very careful in placing my work where it is most likely to get accepted. Even with that, my acceptance rate was a 2:3 ratio. (There were also numbers for creative pieces included in the original post.)

From my CV (and old CVs):
11 journal articles published
6 book reviews
2 chapters (2 others were accepted and not published)
(3 encyclopedia articles accepted but never published–Based on my experience, then, encyclopedia articles are not worth doing.)

At one point I wanted to include on my CV a section labeled “Not Published Due to Recession.”

My experience:
In the last 15 months…
Writing about Writing
Publications and Research
Working on a Revision
4 Ways to Write a Paper in a Hurry

Successful academic writing information:
Good Advice for Successful Academic Research and Writing
Style in Academic Writing
Don’t Get Too Attached

Good advice:
On Publishing
On Writing Book Reviews

Relevant links:
330-word guide to writing book proposals
the down-and-dirty article

Sources for CFPs:
UPenn
H-Net

I have also written 2 other articles I didn’t submit. One would probably have been published, but the other probably would not have been. Why didn’t I submit either one?

The first one was on a topic I was (at the time) thinking I needed to quit working on. I should still have submitted the article. I eventually revised the work and submitted it to a journal. If I had sent it in at the time, however, it would already be published, whereas right now it is in the submission process.

The second one was written for a presentation and the possibility of publication. However, for it to have been worth being published I would have had to have done a lot more work on it and it was a “niche” topic that was interesting to the convention I presented at, but less likely to be publishable. It also wouldn’t advance the work I want/need to do, so I am letting that go.

The work I have already put in on the second possibility is not worthless, however, because the process of considering how I could get it done in the limited time available to me (and researching what work I needed to do to make it “complete”) gave me ideas and resources for work that is within the purview of my interests and area.

I have written at least 17 other full articles that were not accepted. Unlike what I should have done, what my colleagues said to do, I have not looked for other places for those to be accepted and gone full-bore forward with the work. Having sat in on the class, I will go back through those works and consider if there is potential in the works–both are other publication sites possibilities and will this work that I’ve already done serve to advance the work I am already doing and will continue to do as I have narrowed my interests/focus.

I hope that this post offers a window into writing as academics because writing is such a large part of the work.

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