From the category archives:

Rhetoric

CFP: YA Lit and Comp

by Dr Davis on December 6, 2014

Original CFP from UPenn:

YA Literature and Composition
full name / name of organization:
Dr. Tamara Girardi and Dr. Abigail Scheg
contact email:
[email protected]
While adult book sales have been down for the past few years, sales of young adult titles have increased as much as 30% according to some reports. The turn of the millennium brought an explosion of YA sales with the most notable Harry Potter, Twilight, Hunger Games, and Divergent series. YA sections grew from a few shelves to prominent areas in libraries and major bookstores. In fact, a recent Pew Survey reported that 16-29 year-olds check out library books more than any other group.
Despite assumptions that kids don’t read, young adults entering college classrooms are reading recreationally more so than any generation before them. Additionally, many popular films and television shows are based on young adult novels and series. With the prevalence of contemporary young adult literature in their lives, it is logical to question how a connection can be made to their learning in academia.
This collection will explore such connections, specifically in the college composition classroom, although some references to literature and creative writing classrooms are also welcome. While the heart of the exploration involves the reading and writing of young adult literature, the ultimate goal should be to discuss how one or both might inform composition pedagogy.
Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
-Early young adult texts such as Maureen Daly’s Seventeenth Summer, S.E. Hinton’s The Outsiders, and works by Judy Blume, Lois Duncan, and Robert Cormier and how these texts relate to contemporary YA literature.
-Why specific themes or tropes connect well with high school and college students.
-Contradictions between YA reader’s interests in dark issues such as addiction, suicide, terminal illness, sexuality, abuse and their parents and/or teachers anticipation that such issues are too serious for them.
-Variations in genres within the YA framework and how knowledge of genre differences might influence greater understanding and appreciation for non-traditional literary works.
-Comparison between new adult and young adult genres.
-Popularity of YA literature with adults.
-The cathartic experience of writing and reading about challenges faced during one of the most formative times in a student’s life.
-Composition assignments and pedagogy that feature YA literature in some way.
Please send inquiries or abstracts of approximately 250 words to [email protected] by July 1, 2014. Editors for this collection are: Dr. Tamara Girardi (@TamaraGirardi), Harrisburg Area Community College, and Dr. Abigail Scheg (@ag_scheg), Elizabeth City State University.

However, Dr. Scheg’s Twitter feed today reads:
YA lit and comp

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Visual Form and Memory 4

by Dr Davis on November 29, 2014

steampunk_icon_for_Safari_by_yereverluvinuncleber-d4zhax0Vivian, Bradford and Anne Teresa Demo. “Introduction.” Rhetoric, Remembrance, and Visual Form. Eds. Anne Teresa Demo and Bradford Vivian. New York: Routledge, 2012. eBook.

“to animate rather than ‘fix’ the profound resonance of place and space, monuments and memorials, and media and mediums as dynamic sites of artistic, social, or political exchange in modern popular culture” (Vivian and Demo)

“physical locations and environments constitute deeply evocative loci of memory” (Vivian and Demo)

“material substrate of memory” (Vivian and Demo)

“inscribed on the ground and in the mind, erasing a prior landscape of cultural myth and memory before being partially written over by newly emerging identities” (Vivian and Demo)

“works elicit viewers’ personal awareness of history” (Vivian and Demo)

“exemplify how habits of seeing, remembering, and travelling materially intersect” (Vivian and Demo)

“anticipatory memory’ or ‘preemptive nostalgia’ based not on previous experience but on perceptions, expectations and desires gleaned through memoirs, travel guides, prints, photographs, and films prior to one’s visit to the actual sites” (Vivian and Demo)

“visual memory can ironically precede corporeal experience” (Vivian and Demo)

“how subjects which resist both visual representation and coherent communal recollection compel us to question the material form and rhetorical function of conventional monuments and memorials” (Vivian and Demo)

“vibrant nexus of innovative and potentially transformative artistic, social, and political practices” (Vivian and Demo)

“particular challenge that confronts memory artists as well as the viewing public: how to reconcile the charged space between two primary ‘forms’ of memory—the work’s inhabitation of an amorphous public space and viewers’ reinterpretation of its memorial symbolism” (Vivian and Demo)

“contestation between instrumental and cultural representations of collective memory” (Vivian and Demo)

“unusual media or mediums of memory and the rhetorically malleable aura they lend to objects of memory” (Vivian and Demo)

“essentially animate forms in the production of sight as memory” (Vivian and Demo)

“formation of artistic memory” (Vivian and Demo)

What I think about this introduction is that it offers a lot of good ideas of how to approach the cosplay and convention. I think that costumes are ‘unusual media of memory’ and they are also ‘cultural representations of collective memory.’ A cosplayer is ‘essentially [an] animate form’ that produces memory through sight.

Conventions are the places that ring with the animation of meanings–”dynamic sites” of social exchange in the making of popular culture meaning. For this reason they are the geography of memory.

I think the anticipatory memory can also be related to con goers, who may have heard about but have no previous experience with cons. When there is a disconnect between their expectations and their experiences, they do not acculturate or go from fans to part of the con community.

RCMF

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Visual Form and Memory 3

by Dr Davis on November 28, 2014

steampunk_icon_for_Safari_by_yereverluvinuncleber-d4zhax0Vivian, Bradford and Anne Teresa Demo. “Introduction.” Rhetoric, Remembrance, and Visual Form. Eds. Anne Teresa Demo and Bradford Vivian. New York: Routledge, 2012. eBook.

“inherently susceptible to distortion, such that they deprive us of sight and memory precisely in appearing to furnish them” (Vivian and Demo)

“acute sensitivity to this interplay of presence and absence, of constant conjunction and disjunction among visual and memorial forms” (Vivian and Demo)

“The notion that visual forms and forms of memory share the same ostensible substance is one of the most deeply engrained structures of feeling in late modernity” (Vivian and Demo)

“rhetorical form and function of the materiality that inheres between images and memory” (Vivian and Demo)

“memory is profoundly informed by visual media, through rhetorical dynamics: visual and memorial forms coalesce according to the ways in which practices of interpretation, argumentation, or communication assign shared meaning” (Vivian and Demo)

“the past is not preserved but is reconstructed on the basis of the present” (Halbwach quoted in Vivian and Demo)

“interpretive, argumentative, or communicative content of images as well as memories” (Vivian and Demo)

“rhetorical confluences of visual and memorial forms” (Vivian and Demo)

“how images may express seemingly permanent and transient impressions of the past” (Vivian and Demo)

“images may provide material sites of memory” (Vivian and Demo)

“The relevant rhetorical question is why material intersections among images and memory sometimes succeed and sometimes fail as persuasively wrought depictions—or sightings—of the past” (Vivian and Demo)

RCMF

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Visual Form and Memory 2

by Dr Davis on November 27, 2014

steampunk_icon_for_Safari_by_yereverluvinuncleber-d4zhax0Vivian, Bradford and Anne Teresa Demo. “Introduction.” Rhetoric, Remembrance, and Visual Form. Eds. Anne Teresa Demo and Bradford Vivian. New York: Routledge, 2012. eBook.

“examining the simultaneously authentic yet manipulated qualities of memory as conjured through visual modes” (Vivian and Demo)

“visual representations in general acquire historical or memorial meaning as a result of their cultural and technological circulation” (Vivian and Demo)

“contemporary artists routinely demonstrate the power of visual forms to evoke compelling senses of memory… dramatizing its personal, cultural, and technological variability” (Vivian and Demo)

“academic study and cultural activity, concerning either memory or visual form, draw from scattered sources and exemplars among their counterparts; yet they remain substantially separate domains of inquiry or endeavor” (Vivian and Demo)

“individual studies of memory grounded in visual representations” (Vivian and Demo)

“Artists whose work explores questions of memory and vision and scholars of visual culture or public memory” (Vivian and Demo)

I wonder why academics who are studying something that is studied in other disciplines tend to only look within their own disciplines. Recently a student applied communication theories to literature and folks realized it was revolutionary. We SHOULD be reading in related areas outside our fields. That’s one thing I learned from this RCMF project.

RCMF

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Texas in Speculative Fiction

by Dr Davis on November 26, 2014

Looking at Texas as a setting in science fiction and fantasy for a possible presentation. I found a site the other day that had a lot of good information, but then when I went trying to find it again, I had trouble. Just found it. Apparently I thought that an Amazon link couldn’t possibly be the page I was looking for, but it was. For future reference, when I need this link again, it is here.

I should also remember, as I am thinking about this, that I bought two sf books from a Texas author at Lone Star WorldCon in 2013. Those are on the bottom shelf in the living room bookcase on the far right.

When I was thinking about this project, I had seriously considered focusing on the work of Robert E. Howard, but I decided that I would rather go in a more general direction, at least right now.

Presentations of Texas in sff… That is very similar to the work I did for WorldCon 2014–and that I am working on for possible publication now.

If I’m doing that now, why am I working on this? Because the abstract is due soon, of course!

I had given up on the conference when the CFP came out because I didn’t have any ideas. Then the theory for my WorldCon paper came together and it is relevant to this idea for Texas as a setting. Now it will work and so I need to get the abstract done.

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Travel and Memory

by Dr Davis on November 26, 2014

Duro, Paul. “’A Disturbance of Memory’: Travel, Recollection, and the Experience of Place.” Rhetoric, Remembrance, and Visual Form. Eds. Anne Teresa Demo and Bradford Vivian. New York: Routledge, 2012. eBook.

steampunk_icon_for_Safari_by_yereverluvinuncleber-d4zhax0“experience cannot be separated from recollection, rendering the actual event an always already memory that frames the way we experience the sense of place” (Duro)

“expectations confounded by the peculiarly alienating effect that opposed anticipation and arrival” (Duro)

“stabilizing persistence of place as a container of experience that contributes so powerfully to its intrinsic memorability” (Duro)

“memory may antedate the actual experience of place” (Duro)

“the visit offered itself as a mediation through which notions of reality and truth, of rightness, and a sense of place, to say nothing of his anticipatory memories, were given a seeming coherence” (Duro)

Though this chapter is specifically about travel and travel journals, I think there are a few things that relate to conventions and the experience of a con.

RCMF

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Memory and Installations

by Dr Davis on November 25, 2014

Ewing, Margaret. “The Unexpected Encounter: Confronting Holocaust Memory in the Streets of Post-Wall Berlin.” Rhetoric, Remembrance, and Visual Form. Eds. Anne Teresa Demo and Bradford Vivian. New York: Routledge, 2012. eBook.

“visual cues offer the first indication of a site’s significance” (Ewing)

“the installations trigger memorial operations in the mind, thereby facilitating a personal assimilation of history” (Ewing)

“perception of the site shifts in the experience of the artists’ interventions” (Ewing)

These three quotes seem to offer implications for conventions, though the author is specifically talking about transitory art installations.

RCMF

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Landscape and Memory

by Dr Davis on November 24, 2014

steampunk_icon_for_Safari_by_yereverluvinuncleber-d4zhax0Hammer, Andrea. “Memory Lines: The Plotting of New York’s New Military Track.”
Rhetoric, Remembrance, and Visual Form. Eds. Anne Teresa Demo and Bradford Vivian. New York: Routledge, 2012. eBook.

“any landscape—as a continually unfolding story and vast mnemonic device, a living, shifting repository of marks, lines, and erasures that “speak” of past lives, past events, past cultural myths and meanings”
This applies, I think, to the experience of a convention.

To understand landscape = “to carry out an act of remembrance” (Tim Ingold qtd. in Hammer)

RCMF

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Visual Form and Memory

by Dr Davis on November 23, 2014

steampunk_icon_for_Safari_by_yereverluvinuncleber-d4zhax0Vivian, Bradford and Anne Teresa Demo. “Introduction.” Rhetoric, Remembrance, and Visual Form. Eds. Anne Teresa Demo and Bradford Vivian. New York: Routledge, 2012. eBook.

“To remember in late modernity is to store, send, or retrieve content” (Vivian and Demo)

“resources of personal memory training represent contemporary self-help equivalents to the classical ars memoriae” (Vivian and Demo)

“internet search thus provides a suggestive juxtaposition between contemporary technologies of memory and the classical art of memory” (Vivian and Demo)

“Associations between memory and visual phenomena supply the common denominator between these apparently antithetical paradigms of memory” (Vivian and Demo)

“the ancient memories were trained by an art which reflected the art and architecture of the ancient world” (Frances Yates qtd in Vivian and Demo).

“To remember, then as now, is to see.” (Vivian and Demo)

“generate valuable insights concerning not only how memories may be seen in visual form but also how visual forms constitute noteworthy material sites of memory” (Vivian and Demo)

“visual media can efficiently and reliably hypostasize the putative contents of memory” (Vivian and Demo)

“we presume an ability to mechanistically retrieve either part or all of our memories through some form of sight” (Vivian and Demo)

“visual artifacts materially facilitate practices of remembrance” (Vivian and Demo)

“contemporary artists routinely demonstrate the power of visual forms to evoke compelling senses of memory… dramatizing its personal, cultural, and technological variability” (Vivian and Demo)

“memory is profoundly informed by visual media, through rhetorical dynamics: visual and memorial forms coalesce according to the ways in which practices of interpretation, argumentation, or communication assign shared meaning” (Vivian and Demo)

“The relevant rhetorical question is why material intersections among images and memory sometimes succeed and sometimes fail as persuasively wrought depictions—or sightings—of the past” (Vivian and Demo)

“visual memory can ironically precede corporeal experience” (Vivian and Demo)

RCMF

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CFP Rhetoric in New Zealand

by Dr Davis on November 18, 2014

Reason Plus Enjoyment Conference 2015 10-13 July
full name / name of organization:
School of Arts and Media, University of New South Wales, Sydney Australia
contact email:
[email protected]
Next year marks the ten-year anniversary of the Rhetoric, Politics, Ethics 2005 conference in Ghent, Belgium, which gathered international scholars from a variety of critical perspectives to map recent signature events in contemporary theory. Reason Plus Enjoyment 2015 marks this occasion by inviting critical and cultural theorists to Sydney, Australia to reflect on the theoretical challenges posed in the intervening years. The remit of this second RPE conference is to read the vanishing futures of to phronein (thinking) and to kharein (enjoyment) in the twilight of what Derrida called the great Western metaphysical adventure. Joan Copjec once diagnosed our critical condition in terms of the “euthanasia of pure reason”. This interdisciplinary conference draws on a wide spectrum of interests to explore the endgames of Reason. What new, ‘bastard’ forms of aesthetic, political, rhetorical, sexual and technical rationality (and their enjoying subjects) are emerging in the 21st century?

Conference organisers: Kate Montague, Sigi Jöttkandt, Mark Steven

Please submit abstracts by February 15th, 2015 to Kate Montague kateamontague[at]gmail.com

From UPenn.

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